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Yamabuki-iro

 
Kanji 山吹色
Kana やまぶきいろ
Romaji Yamabuki-iro
English Mountain Rose, Easter Rose
Hex #F8B400
RGB R:248 G:180 B:000
CMYK C:00 M:36 Y:95 K:00
Pronunciation

Yamabuki-iro is a yellow color with a vivid reddish tinge that is said to resembles the color of the yamabuki flower.

Dyeing Method

Yamabuki-iro dye is created with the fruit pods of kuchinashi (Gardenia jasminoides). After the petals have fallen off, the pods are harvested and dried.

To create the dye, the dried pods are brought to boil and during the boiling process the pods are crushed against the sides of the pot to help release the color, then filtered through a fine mesh. Repeating the process 4 times produces a deep orange dye bath, which creates a brilliant, vivid yellow color. Creme of tarter can be used as a mordant, however, the Uemura Dye Archive does not list a required mordant.

Seasonality & Exceptions

The harvested and dried fruit pods of the kuchinashi are used for making yamabuki-iro dye.
Yamabuki blossoms


Yamabuki blooms briefly in mid April, appearing shortly after sakura have bloomed. Therefore its vivid color is considered a radiant symbol of mid to late spring.

History of Use

The usage of yamabuki can be dated as far back as sometime after 759 AD during Nara period, being used as a beloved symbol of late spring in the Man'yōshū (literally "Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves"), the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry.

During the Heian period, yamabuki-iro became an important color in kasane no irome and the aristocratic kimono color scheme.

During the Edo period, as the rich color of yamabuki-iro was likened to the color of gold, the color name was used in a pejorative sense, as in a bribe (referencing the oval gold coin currency used during Edo period).


Other Names

Kanji Romaji English
黄金色 Ōgonshoku Golden
こがねいろ Kogane-iro Gold color
花山吹 Hanayamabuki Flower yamabuki
朽葉色 Kuchihairo Decayed leaves
Ura Back / reverse side

In Literature

The color yamabuki-iro is mentioned often in The Tale of Genji (in certain translations, called kerria, based on it's scientific name). One such mention:

"Murasaki had prepared the floral offerings.
She chose eight of her prettiest little girls to deliver them,
dressing four as birds and four as butterflies.
The birds brought cherry blossoms in silver vases,
the butterflies yamabuki in gold."[1]

In Poetry

Kasane no Irome

Name Hitoe Kinu 1 Kinu 2 Kinu 3 Kinu 4 Kinu 5
花山吹
HANA YAMABUKI

Flowering Kerria-Rose

Ao
Blue-Green



Ao
Blue-Green

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

Citation: affirmed by 9784416805442, LizaDalby, Fuyuya.com, Kariginu.jp, SengokuDaimyo


Name Hitoe Kinu 1 Kinu 2 Kinu 3 Kinu 4 Kinu 5
山吹の匂
YAMABUKI NO NIOI

Scent of Kerria-Rose

Ao
Blue-Green



Ao
Blue-Green


Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

より淡い朽葉
Yoi Awaii Kuchiba
Lighter (lit. "More Light") Decayed-Leaves (color)


より淡い朽葉
Yoi Awaii Kuchiba
Lighter (lit. "More Light") Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)


淡朽葉
Awaii Kuchiba
Light Decayed-Leaves (color)

朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)


朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)


Name Hitoe Kinu 1 Kinu 2 Kinu 3 Kinu 4 Kinu 5
裏山吹 / URA YAMABUKI
Reverse-Side Kerria-Rose

Ao
Blue-Green



Ao
Blue-Green

Lining
朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)

Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

Lining
朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)

Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

Lining
朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)

Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

Lining
朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)

Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

Lining
朽葉
Kuchiba
Decayed-Leaves (color)

Ki
Yellow



Ki
Yellow

Citation: Colors and Linings affirmed by 9784416805442, LizaDalby, Fuyuya.com, Kariginu.jp, SengokuDaimyo; Top colors, existence and seasonality affirmed by SengokuDaimyo; Fuyuya.com displays a possible unlined variant with the same surface colors in addition to the lined version on another page.


References

  1. Murasaki Shikibu. Seidensticker, Edward G, translator.The Tale of Genji. Penguin Books, year. p.

Authors & Contributors

Author/s: Naomi Graham Hormozi (Immortal Geisha (IG Username))

Contributors: