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Himo

Himo is a general term for various types of ties used by men and women in kimono dressing.

Types of Himo

Hakama-himo

Main article: Hakama

Haori-himo

Koshi-himo

While most commonly made of muslin, koshi himo can be made of other fabrics such as silk gauze, rubber with velcro, elastic and recycled kimono fabric.

Muslin Rubber Elastic Silk Gauze
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Himo rubber.jpg
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Benefits Grips all fabric well.

Cons None.

Benefits Easy to use and fast to put on.

Cons May not be secure enough for those needing control with smaller, antique pieces. Not breathable. Rubber may over stretch and break down over time.

Benefits Easy to use, highly adjustable and faster to put on.

Cons May not be secure enough for those needing control with smaller, antique pieces

Benefits Grips all fabric well and breathable.

Cons Often shorter than muslin ones.

Use in Kitsuke

Himo One Himo Two Himo Three
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The first himo is used to close the juban. The second himo is used to help position kimono at the right length. The third himo is used after ohashori is created


Tying Himo

The most common ways of tying himo are:

Bow Square Knot Wisteria Knot
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While there may be distinct preferences between the various kitsuke schools, there is no real right or wrong way to tie your himo. You need to find a style that is comfortable and works for you.



Handy Tips!

Handy Tip!
Always carry a spare koshi himo with you when you go out, as you never know when you may need one! They can assist when using the rest room by tying the layers up, or help hold your sleeves back.