Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

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Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:20 pm

Musashi

Well, to sum it up a bit (before I start ranting and rambling again)...

If we take samurai daughters, then it's pretty easy. Mainly, they were used as political tools (like the nobility in Europe did it). Marriages were usually arranged. Many samurai daughters were also used as spies by their fathers. A famous example for such a marriage is Oda Nobunaga's sister Oichi, a very tragic figure in history.

[quote]Oichi
d.1583
Oda Nobunaga's Sister

Few women in Japanese history have quite the pathos of Oichi, a sister of Oda Nobunaga reknowned for her beauty. She was initially was married to Shibata Katsuie after the latter begged pardon for an abortive rebellion in 1557. Following Nobunaga's conquest of Mino in 1567, Nobunaga made Shibata divorce Oichi so that she might be sent as wife to the young Asai Nagamasa, lord of N. Ãâ€

Don't worry about it.

Oda Nobunaga: http://www.samurai-archives.com/nobunaga.html

There's actually a funny saying about the unification of Japan and the three unifiers. Nobunaga made the dough, Hideyoshi baked the cake and Ieyasu ate it all up.

Ran is about an old lord, who has three sons. In order to protect his land, though, he plans to divide it among his three sons. The youngest one, though, disagrees and is expelled for that action (the old lord gives each of them an arrow and tells them to break it, which is easy; then he gives them a bunch of arrows, the first two sons fail breaking it and the old rambles about how the arrows withstand when united... but then the youngest son takes the arrows and breaks them over his knee). The oldest son is married to Kaeda, who survived the massacre of her family, which was performed by the old lord when he took the castle of her family... The second son is married to another survivor of such an event, and she has a blind brother, who's living in a small hut away from the castles. The youngest son is taken in by a rivalling lord... What follows is a tragedy of Shakespeareian level.

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:21 pm

kugepoet

Musashi wrote:
Ran is about an old lord, who has three sons. In order to protect his land, though, he plans to divide it among his three sons. The youngest one, though, disagrees and is expelled for that action (the old lord gives each of them an arrow and tells them to break it, which is easy; then he gives them a bunch of arrows, the first two sons fail breaking it and the old rambles about how the arrows withstand when united... but then the youngest son takes the arrows and breaks them over his knee). The oldest son is married to Kaeda, who survived the massacre of her family, which was performed by the old lord when he took the castle of her family... The second son is married to another survivor of such an event, and she has a blind brother, who's living in a small hut away from the castles. The youngest son is taken in by a rivalling lord... What follows is a tragedy of Shakespeareian level.


That would be because "Ran" is Kurosawa's adaptation of "King Lear," just as "Throne of Blood" is his "Macbeth."

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:22 pm

Musashi

kugepoet wrote:
That would be because "Ran" is Kurosawa's adaptation of "King Lear," just as "Throne of Blood" is his "Macbeth."


Thank you. I didn't know which Shakespeare play he used, because I a) forgot, and b) never read Shakespeare.

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:22 pm

Desu

I think they mean cut their teeth as in teething, i.e. they grew up as pirates.

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:23 pm

Musashi

Desu wrote:
I think they mean cut their teeth as in teething, i.e. they grew up as pirates.


Yep.

It's interesting though, how the Mori ultimately lost against Nobunaga, because a) their daimyo was too reluctant and b) Nobunaga just used more advanced technology.

Now I'm trying to think of what I have possibly missed.

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:23 pm

shiroi yasha

wow.. i read it all..its amazing to think that things like that are real.. :cry: if you think about it in these times we are so peaceful despite whats gong on in america and the middle east and the increase of gang violence and what not..but even so i could never imagine those things..and when i do it all seems like a movie or something. :o

ealier you mentioned Yodogimi so what happend to her? :?

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Re: Life for women in the edo and meiji period & earlier history

Post by IG Team » Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:24 pm

Musashi

Yodogimi became Toyotomi Hideyoshi's favorite concubine. She had two sons, Tsurumatsu, who died young, and Hideyori (who later became the Toyotomi heir). Since Hideyoshi's first wife, Kita-no-Mandokoro had no children, Yodogimi took over several of her privileges, and finally her position.

When the old Ieyasu marched on Osaka (which was the capital of Toyotomi territory) during the final campaign against them in summer 1615, Yodogimi and Hideoyori committed suicide when the castle was taken by the Tokugawa forces. With their death the Oda and Toyotomi blood lines pretty much come to an end.

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