19th-century pregnant dolls (may or may not be ntsfw)

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19th-century pregnant dolls (may or may not be ntsfw)

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 7:19 pm

Kumiyanagi

I was googling ningyo, as you do, when I came across something I just have to share.
The text says
Quote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, sideshow carnivals known as misemono were a popular form of entertainment for the sophisticated residents of Edo (present-day Tokyo). The sideshows featured a myriad of educational and entertaining attractions designed to evoke a sense of wonder and satisfy a deep curiosity for the mysteries of life. One popular attraction was the pregnant doll. Although it is commonly believed that these dolls were created primarily to teach midwives how to deliver babies, evidence suggests they were also used for entertainment purposes. For example, records from 1864 describe a popular show in Tokyo’s Asakusa entertainment district that educated audiences about the human body. The show featured a pregnant doll whose abdomen could be opened to reveal fetal models depicting the various stages of prenatal development. Similarly, records of Japan’s first national industrial exhibition in 1877 indicate a Yamagata prefecture hospital doctor named Motoyoshi Hasegawa showed off an elaborate set of fetus models illustrating seven different stages of growth, from embryo to birth. Although it is unclear whether the fetus model set pictured here is the same one Hasegawa showed in 1877, records suggest his model was a hit at the exhibition.

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From Pink Tentacle http://pinktentacle.com/2009/05/pregnan ... iod-japan/

I amazed at the detail and craftsmanship they put into these dolls. :drooldrool: I don't they they left anything out. Stretch marks, linea nigra, placenta, veins, umbilical cord, decidua and everything! I don't remember my maternity barbie having any of that, or come to think of it anything like it in the hospitals maternity ward. I wonder if they still make them, probably not but still, every medical based museum should have some. Educational, sensitive, historically relevant, down right awesome, they have everything! As you can see my eyes are pretty green right

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