Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

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Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:42 am

bebemochi

I know it's not technically time, but I live in Georgia and it's been consistantly between 80 and 90 degrees Farenheit for the past month. I wore my lined kimono (I've got no hitoe!) last week and nearly died. What do y'all think?

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:43 am

kikuko

Usumono are not meant to actually be cooler, but to evoke the image of coolness. With usumono you are still meant to wear a hadajuban, a juban, the kimono itself, and an obi. I doubt you'd really be all that cool under three layers even if they were see through.

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:43 am

bebemochi

Oh no, I disagree. Since both my kimono and my juban are ro (okay, they're not ro silk, but still) the air really moves through them and they're much cooler. It makes a huge difference that air can move around my legs and arms. :)

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:44 am

arhianrad

I think that you should wear kimono according to YOUR seasons. If one lives in Australia, where it is winter in July, one doesn't wear ro even if the Japanese calendar says so. One wears a winter kimono. Just my thoughts. It sounds like summer temps down there, so I don't think you'd be doing anything SOOOOO wrong.

In Pittsburgh, it's still very much spring, and I don't think I could get away with it. So I wouldn't break out my ro or sha hitoe until June...but then it's about 60 degrees outside, and has been for the past few weeks.

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by Immortal Geisha » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:44 am

ImmortalGeisha

Dude - there is no way I'm wearing lined kimono here in South Florida right now - it is way too obnoxious. Seasons be damned! If I had a Ro kimono and wore it...and came across people that understood kimono - I'd just explain to them that while I know technically it isn't the right time for it - but with the weather like it is......I'd rather not faint beign swaddled up!

But - on the same token - I think you should get hitoe anyhow. Everyone needs more kimono. :wink:

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:45 am

askerry

So because I am a total geek...and because I couldn't get to sleep last night until 4am,
I did a comparison of average temperatures and rainfall for Kyoto, Japan, Columbus, GA, and Morristown, NJ. :oops:

Result: It's hard to compare seasons with Japan.

In Japan, June and July are the top months for rain, and the start of the rainy season is intimately connected with wearing ro (obi from the 10th). August is the apex for heat in the year, and noticably drier than the months surrounding it. July and August (ro) average temperature (average high + low /2) is about 10F higher than June (hitoe).

Northern New Jersey's climate is fine for the prescribed clothing changes, but the arc of the season is subtley different from Japan. We don't have a rainy season although, on average, there is more precipitation in September, July, and May. And while we get July "dog days" too, temperatures are already leveling out and actually starting to fall by August. Summer feels uniformly hazy, hot, and humid late June through August, puctuated by unpleasant heatwaves or thunderstorms, depending on how the weather gods are feeling.

Columbus, GA seems to get most of its rain in winter/early spring, with the exception of July. The hot summer months start in May. July and August (ro) are only a couple degrees hotter than June (hitoe), but about 10F hotter than May (awase/hitoe). Like NJ, average temperatures also start to drop in August, rather than continuing to rise like Kyoto. Those extra few degrees mean that, by September, average temperatures in GA are actually on par with Kyoto.

The short version: :oops:
Both NJ and GA:
no summer rainy season
temperature peaks in July

GA:
summer is longer, beginning in May.

It seems head-slappingly obvious you should wear all-ro starting in June because you have a longer summer. But how soon can you push it? The only arbitrary cut-off I can think of would be like "no ro before Boy's Day" or something. Which is pretty duh. Without the seasonal trigger (rains), is there another organic marker or "a-ha" moment in your climate for changing over to ro? First sign of [blank]? Of course global warming being what it is...

So, being practical about it, you could use average temperature (high + low/2) above 60F for transition to hitoe kimono, and above 70F for ro, adjusting for any abnormal highs as the weather unfolds. If you wanted to make some reference to tradition, maybe switch to all-hitoe when the nagajuban would change to hitoe in mid-April--and then hurry the newly-declared Georgia ro season along shortly after. :lovelove

PS There's no escape--you need some hitoe kimono! :wink:

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:45 am

carmen

Bottom line for me: We are not Japanese (most of us) and are therefore not technically bound by the same rules.

We did a tea demonstration at a high school in early March. Naturally everyone wore lined kimono. But it was SO hot and muggy, I vowed that my next few kimono WOULD BE RO or at the very least, hitoe. I live in Texas, which has a ridiculously long summer (6 months really) and if I am going to wear kimono, I'd rather not sweat buckets while I'm doing it.

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Re: Can I get out my ro kimono yet?

Post by IG Team » Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:46 am

bebemochi
askerry wrote:So because I am a total geek...and because I couldn't get to sleep last night until 4am,
I did a comparison of average temperatures and rainfall for Kyoto, Japan, Columbus, GA, and Morristown, NJ. :oops:
I am extremely grateful that you geeked out on my behalf. I hope this project was helpful in putting you to sleep! :P But seriously, this is something that would have never occurred to me to do, so I am really appreciative that you were thinking outside of the box for me.
askerry wrote:It seems head-slappingly obvious you should wear all-ro starting in June because you have a longer summer. But how soon can you push it? The only arbitrary cut-off I can think of would be like "no ro before Boy's Day" or something. Which is pretty duh. Without the seasonal trigger (rains), is there another organic marker or "a-ha" moment in your climate for changing over to ro? First sign of [blank]? Of course global warming being what it is...
Well...this sounds dumb, but when it gets to be that temperatures are consistantly above 70 degrees Farenheit (sp?), the magnolias bloom. Do you think that would be a good "sign"? This usually happens after Boy's Day but before the end of May.
askerry wrote:So, being practical about it, you could use average temperature (high + low/2) above 60F for transition to hitoe kimono, and above 70F for ro, adjusting for any abnormal highs as the weather unfolds. If you wanted to make some reference to tradition, maybe switch to all-hitoe when the nagajuban would change to hitoe in mid-April--and then hurry the newly-declared Georgia ro season along shortly after. :lovelove
This is also a very good idea, and way more practical than waiting around for the magnolias to bloom. :roll:
askerry wrote:PS There's no escape--you need some hitoe kimono! :wink:


Gahhhh, I know. And I really want some hitoe, too. Can somebody please give me some money? I'll do...something for you. Like...dance. :oops:

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